L.C. (2007) White acrylic plates with laser cuts, MDF-panels; Measures: ca. 35 cm x 210 cm x 110 cm; photo by Stefan Fischer

 

 

 

 

L.C. (2007) White acrylic plates with laser cuts, MDF-panels; Measures: ca. 35 cm x 210 cm x 110 cm; photo by Stefan Fischer

 

 

 

L.C. (2007) White acrylic plates with laser cuts, MDF-panels; Measures: ca. 35 cm x 210 cm x 110 cm; photo by Stefan Fischer

 

 

 

L.C. (2007) White acrylic plates with laser cuts, MDF-panels; Measures: ca. 35 cm x 210 cm x 110 cm; photo by Stefan Fischer

 

 

 

 

L.C. (2007) White acrylic plates with laser cuts, MDF-panels; Measures: ca. 35 cm x 210 cm x 110 cm; photo by Stefan Fischer

 

 

 

 

L.C. (2007) White acrylic plates with laser cuts, MDF-panels; Measures: ca. 35 cm x 210 cm x 110 cm; photo by Stefan Fischer

 

 

 

L.C. (2007) at Galerie der Hochschule für Grafik und Buchkunst Leipzig; Exhibition:  Der Wal oder Artisten in der Zirkuskuppel curated by Frank Wagner

Installation view with Helmut Mark, Ingo Meller, Ingo Garschke, Günter-Karl Bose a.o.; photo by Stefan Fischer


L.C. is an object with a hidden agenda. L.C. refers to Long Cheng – an airport, which was build and used since 1962 by the Americans during the Vietnam War. During the Laotian Civil War, Long Tieng (also spelled Long Chieng, Long Cheng, or Long Chen) was a town and airbase operated by the CIA of the United States. During this time, it was also referred to as Lima Site 98 (LS 98) or Lima Site 20A (LS 20A). At the height of its significance in the late 1960s, the “secret city” of Long Tieng maintained a population of 40,000 inhabitants, making it the second largest city in Laos at the time, although it never appeared on maps throughout this period.

The object is constructed as an abstract floor piece. It could be seen as a broken airplane wing, as a dysfunctional furniture or an architectual model of an  landing strip. The surfaces of the white acrylic plates are marked by smoothie laser cuts. Most cuts are amorphic – the look as a swarm of accidental holes. Two cuts are geometric (retangles) to underline a strategy of intention and not to be an ornament by chance.


More historical material and image resources about the Long-Cheng-story here: 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Long_Tieng

http://libtreasures.utdallas.edu/xmlui/handle/10735.1/1418

http://murismisadventures.blogspot.de/2014/05/more-mis-adventures-in-laos.html